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Pet Temperature Monitor Roundup – Devices that Keep Pets Safe from the Heat

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One of the biggest concerns people traveling with pets have is keeping them safe from the heat. Whether you’re planning a solo road trip with your furry travel buddy, or traveling across the country in your RV, there will be times when you simply cannot bring your pet with you. When those moments arise, having a device to monitor your pet’s environment, and alert you if the temperature exceeds the limits you set, provides a lot of peace of mind.

The trouble is figuring out which device will work best for you! There are a number of pet temperature monitors on the market, and determining which one will meet your needs can be overwhelming.

To make it easier, we asked the manufacturers of the most popular temperature monitors on the market to allow us to put them to the test. We’ve compared their functionality, ease of use, and costs. You’ll find all the details below, along with our decision on which products we’ll be relying on to keep Ty and Buster safe.

Pet Temperature Monitor Roundup

AnimAlarm

Price: $275 for base station and one remote sensor, plus data subscription

Details:

  • Alerts for temperature and low battery
  • Flexible subscription options (Annual at $90/year, 6 months at $65, and Month-to-Month at $30/month), or add the device to your own data plan by obtaining a SIM card from your cellular carrier
  • Alerts sent via text and email to an unlimited number of people 
  • If conditions do not return to acceptable levels, additional alerts are sent every 2 minutes
  • Quick set up with online dashboard
  • Uses the gsm technology, allowing the device to switch between the AT&T and T-Mobile networks in the United States, depending on which has the stronger signal
  • Base plugs into wall outlet or USB power port in a 12V outlet
  • The base will operate on backup battery for 24 hours or longer
  • Wireless remote sensor is battery-operated with a battery life of 12-18 months
  • Up to five sensors can be monitored by the base (additional sensors are $45 each)
  • Cellular signal strength indicator provided
  • Updates once every 3 minutes, and once every minute when temperatures are outside designated range
  • Comes with a decal for vehicle stating a pet temperature monitor is in use
  • Device may be used worldwide

Things to consider:

  • There is no notification for loss of cellular connection, but you can ‘poll’ the device by text or check the online dashboard to view the temperatures and times and dates they were recorded

Blink Indoor Home Security Camera

Price: $99 (one camera + synch unit), additional cameras $90

While the Blink Indoor Home Security Camera‘s primary function is not temperature monitoring, the cameras have a built-in temperature sensor and the ability to send in-app notifications if the temperature exceeds a selected range. They also provide additional features that may appeal to our readers.

Details:

  • Alerts for temperature, motion detection, low battery, loss of power, and loss of wifi connection
  • No monthly/annual service fees
  • Sends alerts via in-app push notifications to any device logged into the app
  • Quick set up with app
  • The app has a clean design and is easy to use
  • The synch unit plugs into a regular wall outlet or USB power port in a 12V outlet
  • Cameras are wireless and battery-operated with an expected 2-year battery life
  • Multiple cameras can be connected to the synch unit, but must be within range
  • Can be used anywhere a Wifi or Ethernet connection is available
  • Provides current photos and videos, allowing you to visually monitor your pets
Pet Temperature Monitor Roundup - Comparing Devices that Keep Pets Safe from the Heat | GoPetFriendly.com

Things to consider:

  • If conditions do not return to acceptable levels, no additional alerts are sent
  • The only form of alert available (in-app pop-up notifications) are easy to miss
  • First alert for disruption of power or wifi is sent 30 minutes after loss of connection
  • Monitors temperature every 15 minutes; most recent temperature is displayed on the app, but not the time is was recorded
  • Temperature sensor tracks ambient temperature with a 5 to 10 deg. variance, which provides less accuracy than other products tested
  • Requires a Wifi router. Cannot be used on guest wifi networks (like those in RV parks) or tethered using a mobile-enabled device like a phone or tablet.

MarCELL Cellular Connected Temperature Humidity Power Alarm

 

Model Tested: MAR-500

Price: $199, plus data subscription

Details:

  • Alerts for temperature, humidity, and loss of power
  • Flexible data subscription options (Annual at $99/year, Seasonal at $11.95/month (minimum of 4 months and no more than 8 months), and Month-to-Month at $14.95/month with no charge for deactivating or reactivating as long as service is suspended no more than 6 months)
  • Sends alerts via text, email and phone to up to nine recipients
  • If conditions do not return to acceptable levels, additional alerts are sent every 30 minutes
  • Quick set up with app
  • Uses the Verizon cellular network (units utilizing the AT&T network are available through sensoredlife.com)
  • A light indicates whether the device has a cell connection, and a signal strength indicator is provided in the app
  • Plugs into wall outlet; can be adapted for use with USB power port in a 12V outlet
  • Operates on backup battery for up to 30 hours
  • Devices available through sensoredlife.com can be used in Canada, but not in Mexico

Things to consider:

  • Does not work in areas not covered by Verizon
  • There is no notification for loss of cellular connection
  • The device monitors the environment every 10 seconds, and alerts are sent immediately if readings exceed the set range, but updated information is only posted once every 8 hours, so the temperature reported on the app may be up to 8 hours old. To view current conditions, updates can be purchased for 25 cents (sold in packages of 8 for $2).
  • Changes to the preferred temperature or humidity range settings don’t take effect until the next data upload, which could be up to 8 hours
  • While functional, the app would benefit from a fresh design

 

Proteus AMBIO Temperature/Humidity Sensor

Price: $99

Details:

  • Alerts for temperature, humidity, loss of power, and loss of wifi connection
  • No monthly/annual service fees
  • Sends alerts via text and email to multiple recipients
  • If conditions do not return to acceptable levels, you set how often the device resends alerts
  • Quick set up using online dashboard
  • Plugs into a regular wall outlet or USB power port in a 12V outlet
  • Monitors temperature once per minute and displays current data immediately on the online dashboard
  • Can be used anywhere a Wifi or Ethernet connection is available

Things to consider: 

  • No battery backup, so it is not a good choice if your 12V outlet is not live when your vehicle is turned off
  • First alert for disruption of power or wifi is sent 10 minutes after loss of connection
  • An app would be more convenient, but a web browser can be used to navigate to the online dashboard
  • Connecting to a different Wifi network requires the device to be reset
  • Requires a Wifi router. Cannot be used on guest wifi networks (like those in RV parks) or tethered using a mobile-enabled device like a phone or tablet.

RV Pet Safety Pet Temperature Monitor

Model Tested: N5 Pet Temperature Monitor

Price: $299 (includes 1-year cellular subscription, data subscription fees apply after first year)

 Details:

  • Alerts for temperature, low battery, and loss of cellular connection
  • Flexible subscription options (Annual at $120/year, or Month-to-Month at $15/month with a $5 deactivation/reactivation fee.)
  • In-app notifications and alerts sent via text and email to up to 5 people 
  • If conditions do not return to acceptable levels, additional alerts are sent every 10 minutes
  • Quick set up with app
  • The app has a clean design and is easy to use
  • Uses the AT&T and T-Mobile cellular networks 
  • Cellular signal strength indicator provided in the app
  • Plugs into wall outlet or USB power port in a 12V outlet
  • Operates on backup battery for up to 24 – 48 hours
  • Comes with rearview mirror hanger for vehicle stating a pet temperature monitor is in use
  • Device may be used in the US and Canada, but not in Mexico

Things to consider:

  • Does not work in places not covered by AT&T or T-Mobile
  • In-app customer support response time is slow

 

SensorPush Wireless Thermometer plus Wifi Gateway

Model Tested: G1 Wifi Gateway

Price: Each sensor – $49.99, Gateway – $99.95

Details:

  • Alerts for temperature and humidity
  • No monthly/annual service fees
  • Sends alerts via in-app push notifications to any device logged into the app (logins are unlimited)
  • If conditions do not return to acceptable levels, additional alerts are sent every 10 minutes
  • Set up of the gateway plus two sensors took 15-20 minutes
  • The app has a clean design and is fairly easy to use
  • The gateway plugs into a regular wall outlet or USB power port in a 12V outlet
  • Wireless remote sensors are battery-operated and can be expected to last 1 year or more
  • An unlimited number of sensors can be connected to the gateway (additional sensor cost $50 each)
  • Updates once per minute and displays current data immediately on the app
  • Can be used anywhere a Wifi or Ethernet connection is available

Things to consider:

  • No alerts are delivered if the gateway loses power or the wifi connection is interrupted
  • Text, email, and phone alerts are not available at this time
  • Requires a Wifi router. Cannot be used on guest wifi networks (like those in RV parks) or tethered using a mobile-enabled device like a phone or tablet.

Temp Stick Wireless Temperature Sensor

Price: $169

Details:

  • Alerts for temperature, humidity, battery level, and loss of wifi connection
  • No monthly/annual service fees
  • Sends alerts via text and email to multiple recipients
  • If conditions do not return to acceptable levels, alerts are resent every 5 minutes
  • Quick set up with online dashboard or app
  • Battery-operated (2 AA batteries)
  • Both the app and online dashboard have a clean design and are easy to use
  • Can be used anywhere a Wifi or Ethernet connection is available

Things to consider: 

  • Updates once every 15 minutes and displays most recent data in the app and on the online dashboard
  • Battery life is 6-12 months, depending on settings
  • Connecting the device to a different Wifi network requires the device to be reset
  • Requires a Wifi router. Cannot be used on guest wifi networks (like those in RV parks) or tethered using a mobile-enabled device like a phone or tablet.

What Are We Using?

After all the analysis, we’ve decided to use the Proteus AMBIO Temperature/Humidity Sensor to monitor the temperature in the RV when we need to leave Ty and Buster alone. This option is the best solution for us because we looking to monitor the temperature in the motorhome, where our 12V outlets work even when the RV’s not running – so the lack of battery in this unit doesn’t impact us. And since we already have a souped-up cellular Wifi router in the motorhome and get great reception in most places – we’re expecting our connectivity to be as good or better than any of the cellular-enabled temperature monitors.

We also like that the Proteus monitor records the temperature once per minute, which means we’d be alerted quickly if the boys were in danger. Finally, it sends alerts not only for temperature, but for loss of power and loss of wifi connection, so we won’t have to keep one eye on our phones while we’re away wondering if the monitor is working properly. Add all of that to the fact that we won’t have another monthly bill, and it seals the deal!

After our testing, we also added two Blink cameras to the motorhome. While their temperature monitoring functionality didn’t win us over, I do love having the ability to get a quick snapshot or video of the boys while we’re away. It’s a super-convenient way to be able to check on the dogs whenever we’re out.

Are you aware of another pet temperature monitor that you’d like us to test? Leave a comment below and we’ll do our best to get one and include it!

 

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  • It sounds like you worked out a great solutions for Toby, Kathy – and happy birthday to him! I think that you’ll find adding one of these temperature monitors to your car brings you a lot of peace of mind when you do have to leave Toby in the car for a bit. Waggin’ trails to you all!

  • Too bad I didn’t find this site before our road trip to NM and AZ in June with our newest family member Toby. Tomorrow 8/20 is his first birthday! I was so stressed out knowing we would have to leave him in the car during meal and potty stops in the heat of June. We were traveling in our mini-van with our 4 oldest granddaughters and Toby. What I did was find a kennel that fit between the 2nd row seats and put a kennel cover over it. (Hoping that would help keep him calm when left alone.) I purchased a portable AC, a small stroller fan and a protable battery pack/charger. (Our vehicle power supply doesn’t work when the vehicle is off) I tested it a few times before the trip to make sure it would work. I had ice water in the cooler for the portable AC and when we stopped we would put Toby in the kennel with his toys and bedding. I would place the portable AC near the door of the kennel and cover the space between the AC and the kennel so the cool air would only go into the kennel and not the rest of the car. I also ran the fan next to the AC to keep the cool air cirrculating in his kennel. While the rest of the car was well over 100 degrees, the hottest his kennel got was 86 degrees. I placed a thermometer in his kennel that would save the lowest and highest temps. I also attached an animal water bottle to his kennel so that he would have water while we were out of the car as well. It worked out very well but I didn’t have any luck being able to monitor him or the temp while I was away from the car so I will be looking into one of these options before our next trip. Thanks so much for the information, cant wait to check out more of the site.

  • I’m happy to help, Eileen! This is one of our biggest concerns about traving with Ty and Buster, and I know how difficult it can be to decipher which of these devices is “best.” Ultimately, none of the options are perfect – so it’s about deciding which will best serve your needs. I’ll also be following up with some companies that are in the process of bringing new pet monitors to market and will hopefully be allowed to test them and add them to this post in the next few months.

  • Happy birthday to Maddie, and I hope you all have a fantatastic trip! It’s awesome that the Freeze Alarm is still working for you – it’s been more than six years since you wrote the guest post about it. For anyone wanting to see how Harlold is monitoring Maddie’s environment, you’ll find his guest post here: https://blog.gopetfriendly.com/gadgets-that-keep-your…/Waggin’ trails, Harold, Jackie, and Maddie!

  • I have been watching for this update. Thanks so much for the detail. I am currently using the Temp Stick, and while it functions OK I find the battery life is poor. When set to send updates every 15 minutes, the batteries only last a few days. Which essentially means I’m replacing the batteries almost every time I’m using it. I will look carefully at substituting one of the other options. Thanks again!

  • We still use the Freeze Alarm system which still works fine for protecting Maddie. It works wherever we have cell service and takes very little configuration if we change providers or cell phones. We leave in days for an extended trip to the Maritime Provinces and she is already excited and ready to run wild on the deserted beaches to celebrate her 13th birthday in two weeks.

  • Hi Vic! I hope you’re all doing well. We thought about you when we at the Winnebago rally last month. To answer your question, we had some work done on our Wifi this spring and it’s been great. We’re both working from the road, so it’s probably more important to us than to most people in their RVs, but we’re really happy with the results. Of course, I wrote a blog post about it. =D You can get all the deails here: https://blog.gopetfriendly.com/another-rv-internet-upgrade/Waggin‘ trails!

  • We have been using the RV Pet Safety N5 for a couple of years now. Have had a few connection problems with lack of Verizon cell coverage. Would agree customer service is SLOW and can be frustrating. Do like that we get alerts when no cell service, switch to battery and the amount of battery life left as well as temp alerts. This works for us since we do not have a dedicated WiFi for our motorhome. Would be interested in hearing what WiFi set up you have as that is our next area to tackle. We travel with 5 cats and a dog in a motorhome.

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